Learn Chinese Characters for Beginners Easy Fast & Fun | Chinese Stroke Orders Writing Explained

Learn Chinese Characters for Beginners Easy Fast & Fun | Chinese Stroke Orders Writing Explained


Hello welcome back, this is ChineseFor.Us
Hands-on Writing – Stroke by Stroke. 我是Lili. Hey everyone, I’m Chuck.
So far we’ve learned all of the strokes and how they’re constructed. And starting
from this video we’ll be talking about the stroke order rules.
There are only 8 Basic Stroke Order Rules, today we’ll talk about the first 2. Before
we start please have your practice sheet ready. It’s important to practice along with the
video, we believe that understanding the concept is only the first step, but putting what you’ve
learned into practice is what’s really going to give you mastery of Chinese characters.
The first thing we’re going to talk about is, do you really need to follow the stroke
order? If you don’t follow the stroke order can you still write the character?
Well of course you can still write the character, but knowing the stroke order allows you to
write the character more efficiently and allows the character to have the correct proportions.
Also if you don’t know the rules of stroke order, every time you write a character you’ll
have to guess how to write it. It’s a lot harder to remember a character
if you write it differently every time. Because writing involves muscle memory, you
need to repeat the same pattern. So, following the stroke order is the most
efficient way. Here’s Stroke Order Rule No.1: “Horizontal Before Vertical”. In
Chinese it’s called “先横后竖”. “先” means “first”, and “后”
means “afterwards” “先横后竖” literally means First “Horizontal”,
afterwards “Vertical”. Basically what it means is that when there
are both 横 and 竖 in a character, you write “横” before “竖”.
Here’re some example characters. OK, first one, 十(shí). It means “No.10”, remember?
The way you write it, is like this: 横, and then竖.
Now another one. “丰(fēng)”; it means “abundant” or “plentiful”. And when
you write it, you’ll write all 3 横s first, and then finish the character with 竖.
OK, the third one, 干(gān); it means “dry”. I’ll let you decide how to write it first.
Try it on your practice sheet. Yes, the way you write “干”, is write
the 2 横first, and then 竖. 非常好!So now we’ll move on to Stroke
Order Rule No.2. It’s called “先撇后捺”, which means “Downward Left Before Downward
Right” Here let’s see some examples. The first
one is “人”, do you remember this one? It means “people” or “person”. The
way you write it, is to write 撇 first, and then 捺.
Here’s another: 八(bā), it’s “the number 8” in Chinese. And sure enough, you
write 撇 before 捺. The third one, “入(rù)”; means “to
enter”. And we’ll follow the “先撇后捺” rule and write it like so. awesome!
And of course not all Chinese characters are this simple. There’re often multiple different
strokes in one character. And this means, there’re also multiple rules involved.
So we’ve picked one character where you’ll have to use both Rule No.1 and No. 2. Ready?
Here it is! It’s pronounced “木(mù)”, meaning
“tree” or “wood”. And here’s how we’ll write it. 横, 竖, 撇, 捺. And
that’s it! But just like with everything else, there’s
always exceptions. Don’t worry, just stick to the basic stroke orders, we don’t have
to remember all the detailed exception rules, because whenever you learn a new character,
there’s always tracing guide for you to follow.
The more you practice writing characters the more you’ll be able to write from intuition.
So, please download the homework sheet that we provided for you.
The link is right under the video. So I hope this video helps and next time we’ll
talk about 2 more rules. Thanks and see you next time!
谢谢!再见!

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